• Olive Pit Featured Olives of the Week – Happy Holivedays!

    Happy Holivedays – a delicious mix of green, black and red olives with added fresh orange zest, fennel seeds and oil – this is one delicious holiday mix. We also add in some cinnamon sticks and fresh orange slices to bring together the magical flavors of the season.

    Be sure to stop by our Olive Pit, where you can create a fantastic party tray full of olives to take to holiday parties and functions.

    Read article
  • Olive Pit Featured Olives of the Week – Italian, Spanish, and Greek (and Something Spicy)!

    Green Cerignola – a meaty green olive from Italy, it may look like your typical green olive, but not so fast! The Green Cerignola is firm to the touch and not too salty thanks to its water brine. It’s very juicy when you bite into it, so have your napkins handy. The overall flavor of this olive is mellow and earthy – we think it will quickly find a place on your list of favorite Italian olives. Read article
  • Olive Pit Featured Olives of the Week – Italy, Portugal and Greece, Oh My!

    Black Cerignola – a ripe, meaty, black olive from Italy. This olive may look like your typical black olive but this one is anything but. The Black Cerignola is firm to the touch and not too salty since it’s in a water brine. It is very juicy when you bite into it, so have your napkins handy. Overall, this olive is mellow and earthy and will surely find a place on your list of favorite Italian olives.

    Black Portuguese – Read article
  • Olive Pit Featured Olives of the Week – A Few More Interesting Choices

    Taggiasche Ligurian – a ripe, purple olive that hails from Italy. This olive is soft to the touch, and rich with a tart, savory flavor. Grown in Taggia, Italy, this variety was originally brought to that region by the St. Columban monks. It is not one to be missed!

    ​Roasted Red Pepper Stuffed – a firm, green olive stuffed with a delicious roasted red pepper. It may remind you of an old stand by, the pimento stuffed Manzanilla, Read article
  • Olive Pit Featured Olives of the Week – A Delicious Variety!


    ​Amphissa – also known as Amfissa – either way you spell it, this olive is delicious. The Amphissa  is a ripe, soft olive rich in taste and texture that’s preserved in a red wine vinegar brine to add an extra special touch to this already smooth and juicy olive. Of all the table olives grown in Greece, this one is the most popular! 70% of the olives served on the table are Amphissa! Read article
  • Olive Pit Featured Olives of the Week – French, Turkish, and a Little Italian

    Picholine – an oval shaped green olive that is crisp and rich, the Picholine hails from France. Originally grown in the Gard region of France, it’s actually now grown around the world. Picholine olives are often said to be called “the poor man’s Luque,” as they are a close cousin and are similar in size, color and shape. This olive is not to be missed, though – it has a nutty and “snappy” flavor that will delight every fan of olives! Read article
  • Olive Pit Featured Olives of the Week – Something for Everyone!

    Hondroelia – a large, blush colored, midseason olive from Greece. This is considered a mid-season olive because it’s picked after it is no longer green and unripe, but before it is black and fully ripened. Because of that, the texture of this olive is a little on the firmer side but does have a little softness to it. This olive goes by two names: Hondroelia is the most common, but it may be called the Royal olive. Read article
  • Olive Pit Featured Olives of the Week –  From herbs and spices to appetizers and spicy flavor!

    Green Kalamata – Green Kalamata? Yes! While you’re probably familiar with the black variety of this olive, the green is quite special and rare to find outside of its home country, but we have them now for you to try. It is a whole olive, which means it has a pit still intact, and it is slit, or cracked, to allow the salty, lemony brine infuse with the olive. Green Kalamata olives should not be missed due to the limited amount that we were able to import. Read article
Back to Top